“Curve” is a Nightmare Caught on Film

NOPE NOPE NOPE NOPE

I saw a number of short films at Fantastic Fest last year, but Tim Egan’s “Curve” is the one I keep raving about. In certain ways there’s not much to it. The premise is so simple that it’s thematically a blank slate. Is this a metaphor for life in the Trump era? Um… sure? A parable about higher education? Okay! Why not? But that kind of interpretation is missing the point: this film is a nightmare. The abstract cement setting,1 the helplessness of our protagonist’s situation, and plain old acrophobia all mix together into something that is more “horror” than most slasher films could ever aspire to. Check it out.

  1. Hints of dystopia?
  • That looks awful. I’ll have to watch it later

    • We’re talking about doing more coverage like this of short films. I know you’re big into that, so let me know if there’s anything you think we should cover. Or let me know if you want to contribute, for that matter.

      • I have a bunch on deck to watch. I’ll text you about it later after work. Text my new phone, my old one died, but it’s the same number

  • VyceVictus

    Oh my lord this short will fuck you up. It’s incredible how it does so much with so little. My guess was metaphor for addiction, but like you said, who knows.

    • I posted this to MetaFilter and one of the commenters interpreted it as a metaphor for depression.

      • You really can lay anything over it

        • Jamikel

          Yep. It works as a metaphor for any destructive cycle – addiction, depression, poverty, Trump’s America, etc – where you can see the way out, but it’s impossibly out of reach, so all you can do is hang on for dear life to try to keep from slipping even further.

  • jeves23

    Damn this was good. The intersection between sound and image was spot on, with a real sense of the tactile present in both. I could practically feel myself on the curve with her.

    I don’t watch nearly enough short films, but when I do, they are often too slight, or too full (guilty). The best ones – like CURVE – find that sweet spot between concept and execution.